Geneology and Christmas past

Christmas always brings about the conversation of why we celebrate the birth of Jesus in my home.  I have sold it as a birthday party for the man who is believed to be the beginning of what we know to be Christianity.

There used to be a list that got distributed widely about “famous people who were adopted.”  Aside from the wording – WERE adopted as  opposed to ARE adopted, I always thought it odd to include the characters in the Bible – Moses, Jesus….

So, in church we are given the geneological history of Jesus.  Aside from it being an absolute tongue twister, I was struck by the care given to this list.  What struck me more interesting is the way it was presented by the Pastor.  I wrote it down:

This geneology is important as a way of understanding our past and where we are going.  He added that “your past is important only as it leads to today…a prologue to tomorrow.”  The past inspires our present.  Celebrating our past, but not leaving it at that….

Apparently, the list of Jesus’ ancestors is not something that is often read aloud.  It is hard to read, the names are complicated to pronounce.  History is never easy, is it?

What struck me significant is the effort the Bible makes in creating such documentation.  It is further complicated in my head as I think,  if such a revered book takes pains to write this bit of history, I wonder why the many who profess the Bible as their SOURCE can have such trouble acknowledging the history so many adoptees wish for themselves.  To have such a prologue seems to be selective.  Such selectivity makes my heart ache.  I have been fortunate to have a copy of my hojuk (my family registry), but too many of my brothers and sisters are without or are holding onto a fiction created by others who do not deem us worthy of having the same past as them.

My Christmas wish is for us to read this complicated geneology and pray for the same of all those born.  If we see nothing behind us, how do we know where we are going?  How does one move forward with no past?

2 thoughts on “Geneology and Christmas past

  1. I really, really liked the connection that you made here: ” if such a revered book takes pains to write this bit of history, I wonder why the many who profess the Bible as their SOURCE can have such trouble acknowledging the history so many adoptees wish for themselves. ” I’ve worked as an adoption social worker at a faith based agency, and your connection makes a lot of sense to me. Thanks!

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